Vox

Vox
  • 5 minutes
  • 768 episodes
  • vox.com
  • vox
  • news
  • explain
  • ezra klein
  • politics
  • video
  • documentary

Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com.

For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

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What’s the most important question facing the world in 2019? Submit a video at http://www.vox.com/showme Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Do you ever think to yourself, after an unavoidable encounter in the airport with a television that’s blasting cable news, “Why don’t they ever talk about [fill in the blank]?” The news can be confusing, overwhelming, and worst of all, incomplete. That’s where we come in. The Vox video team is launching a new show with YouTube Originals, and it’s unlike anything we’ve done before. Instead of coming up with a bunch of story ideas ourselves, we want your questions to drive our reporting. Tell us: What’s the most important question facing the world in 2019? It can be about anything — science, money, health, relationships, tech, government, and beyond. Your video could be featured in our upcoming series, and we’ll choose 12 of the best question-askers to join us on camera as we report the answers. Do you have a great question for us to explore? Here’s what to do next. Upload a video by Monday, November 5 at www.vox.com/showme telling us your name, where you live, your question, and a personal story about what got you interested in the topic: Did something happen to you or to someone you know? Did you see something in the news and think, “Huh?” Want to increase the likelihood we pick your question? Make sure you’re in the center of the frame, and if you’re on your phone, flip it horizontally! Try to keep windows and bright lights out of the background, and background noise to a minimum. Use an external microphone — earbuds with a built-in mic work great! And finally, keep the video under 5 minutes. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com/ Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

19 hours ago

Why gamers use WASD to move

First person shooters mean WASD. The history of the keyboard default involves a gaming legend and the start of a new era in games. Correction: At 3:36, a previous version of this video misassigned the keys, the error has been fixed Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO To see more of Thresh, check out the eSports episode of Explained on Netflix: www.netflix.com/explained In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the history of a common default keyboard configuration among gamers. Though there’s an inherent logic to WASD — it just works well — there’s also a story behind how it became a near-universal standard. Dennis “Thresh” Fong was one of the first pro gamers to go mainstream playing the first person shooter Quake. By doing so, he set a standard for other gamers to aspire to, including his key control configuration. He discovered that for a new era in which the mouse and keyboard needed to work together, WASD was a great way to do it. Shortly after that, programmers incorporated his schema into their own games, making it a default that millions — whether they knew Thresh or not — would play with. WASD became a standard for a lot of games because of one superstar’s amazing record with it. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

4 days ago

How IKEA gets you to impulsively buy more

IKEA has mastered the “Gruen effect.” Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Researchers estimate that 50 percent of purchases are unplanned. These purchases, especially impulse buys, present an opportunity for retailers who can entice consumers to deviate from their shopping lists. One of the most effective ways to influence this is through a store’s architecture. In the 20th century, the architect Victor Gruen, who pioneered the first American shopping malls, used light and space to dramatically stage goods in storefront windows. His designs were meant to capture the attention of passersby — and convert them into customers. This conversion became known as the “Gruen effect.” Watch the video above to learn how Ikea has mastered the Gruen effect with a carefully designed store layout that gets customers to travel further distances… and buy more. For the curious, here are a few links: Read Jeffrey Inman’s research on unplanned spending: http://www.advancingretail.org/sites/default/files/resources/The-Effect-of-In-Store-Travel-Distance-on-Unplanned-Spending.pdf Watch a video from University College London Professor Alan Penn, who breaks down Ms. Kazim’s research in greater detail: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkePRXxH9D4 And finally, I recommend reading Victor Gruen’s biography, “Mallmaker” by Jeffrey Hardwick. You can also learn more by listening to this 99% Invisible podcast episode that features Hardwick and details the history of the Gruen effect: https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-gruen-effect/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

5 days ago

Why the Marvel Cinematic Universe feels empty

What makes a fictional universe good? In this requested episode of Overrated, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the past and present of fictional universes to try to figure it out. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Want to read more? Check out Sean Howe’s book about Marvel: https://www.amazon.com/Marvel-Comics-Untold-Sean-Howe/dp/0061992119 And explore Tommy’s Universe: https://thetommywestphall.wordpress.com/the-master-list/ Fictional universes and crossovers have been around long before the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The Green Hornet radio show had a crossover with the Lone Ranger that kicked off the trend. In comics, the Marvel Universe started long before Stan Lee was at the helm. But these crossovers have a problem: They can privilege business relationships ahead of storytelling immersion and really interesting universes. As the Tommy Westphall Universe shows, crossovers often become a map of business decisions rather than of integrated fictional stories, and that leads to worse stories. This problem plagues the MCU as well. When Marvel engineers crossovers, they aren’t thinking about a universe transformed by superheroes — they just want more quips, explosions, and cash. Or at least that’s Edwards’s argument — do you think the MCU works? Overrated is a series that takes a look at the things we all know — the books, the trends, and the ideas that have become iconic — and answers the question: “Why is this so famous"? Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 week ago

The big problem with how we pick juries

A legal loophole makes juries less diverse. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Four years after the shooting death of Laquan McDonald, the police officer, Jason Van Dyke, faced his day in court. But in a trial where race became central to the case, there’s only one black person on the jury. And that’s in a county where nearly a quarter of people are black. How did this happen? In jury selection, racial discrimination has historically been tricky. Discrimination isn’t allowed in jury selection, thanks to what’s called a “Batson challenge.” But the problem is — Batson has been widely regarded as a failure at keeping racism out of the jury box. Watch the video above to find out why that is, and why it complicates the prospect of a fair trial by jury. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 week ago

How GPS can make you a better runner

GPS & running: the good, the bad, and the art Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Source: https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14753 “Exercise contagion in a global social network”, Sinan Aral & Christos Nicolaides. Nature Communications, 2017. The Global Positioning System, or GPS, is changing the sport of running. Using GPS makes it easier to track, analyze, and share data about your runs. Some people, like Gene Lu, use the technology to create elaborate drawings, but you don’t need to be an artist in order to use GPS to improve your running. Researchers at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology conducted a study and determined that runners who share their efforts on social networks tend to run farther, faster, and longer than those who do not. With GPS, it’s easy to track and share data about your run. Along with the proliferation of GPS technology, the number of fitness-focused social networks has also increased. Now, runners have many options for where they can go to share their runs: Strava, Nike Run Club, MapMyRun and many others have all made sharing your run easy by developing mobile apps that users can download to their phones. Whether you’re like Gene, who uploads elaborate runs mapped to look like Darth Vader, or just using the app to track your daily jog, social network sharing, made even easier by GPS tracking, can help you improve. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 week ago

How ninjas went mainstream

Ninjas are overrat---just kidding, they’re amazing. But how did they become famous around the world? Check out Vintage Ninja to learn more: http://vintageninja.net/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In this episode of Overrated, Vox’s Phil Edwards gets nunchucked in his heart by ninjas. But why are these secret killers known around the world? The history of ninjas is, fittingly, one with many hidden twists and turns. It starts with the real historical ninjas in feudal Japan, who really did practice what we call ninjutsu. Their mixture of espionage, assassination, and combat was similar to what ninja-fans might imagine, though the reality was more about traveling incognito than looking cool in a black jumpsuit. From there, the ninja quickly became a myth in Japanese culture, entering kabuki theatre as well as manga and novels of the time. Already, the exaggeration of the ninja in Japan had begun, a trend that continued with myth-making Japanese films that vaulted the imaginary ninja into public consciousness. Finally, the ninja traveled to the West from these Japanese films, first showing up in James Bond, and then becoming part of a ninja-sploitation trend. Soon, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles proved the ninja was so famous it could take on postmodern incarnations. But nearly from the beginning, the ninja was as powerful an idea as a reality, a myth in both Japanese and western culture. And, perhaps most importantly, every version of the ninja — real or not — turned out to be awesome. Overrated is a series that takes a look at the things we all know — the books, the trends, and the ideas that have become iconic — and answers the question: “Why is this so famous"? Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 week ago

Why the US celebrates Columbus Day

Should Columbus Day be Indigenous Peoples’ Day? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In past decades, Christopher Columbus has gone from unquestioned US hero to problematic figure. For centuries, the destruction and disease he ushered into the Americas have been set aside, allowing the myth of a pioneering sailor who discovered America and proved the world was round to embed itself in US culture. But as this myth has been increasingly confronted with brutal historical facts, things have started to change. While Columbus still has a national holiday in his honor, complete with parades and celebrations, there are many people fighting to dismantle the myth that surrounds him and choosing to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day instead. Watch this video to understand how Columbus became a US icon over time and why his status is in question today. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

2 weeks ago

Doctor Who could change how women are portrayed in sci-fi

The Doctor’s greatest power? Her sense of humor. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For the first time in its 55-year history, British television show Doctor Who will have a woman in the lead role (played by Jodie Whittaker). Doctor Who isn’t the first sci-fi/fantasy franchise to put a woman at the helm, but it could be one of the most groundbreaking. The character’s development over the years into a witty superhero figure has given it an opportunity to bring a heroine to the screen that is capable of saving the universe — and having a sense of humor while doing it. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

2 weeks ago

The skincare acid craze, explained

What would you do to have perfect skin? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The pursuit of perfect skin has been deeply rooted in human culture. And while skincare acids have been used for decades, they've surged in popularity in recent years. You see them advertised on products in stores and across the internet. Glycolic acid. Lactic acid. Hyaluronic acid. Salicylic acid. Even though they all have one world in common, they all do different things. But acids should be used with caution. Not everyone would benefit from using them, especially people with sensitive skin. And using acids too often can be dangerous and lead to the opposite of perfect skin. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

2 weeks ago

Why the Soviets doctored this iconic photo

This photo conceals a clue to a brutal story of vengeance. Correction: Many of you pointed out that we erroneously used “Russia” and “Russian” interchangeably with “Soviet Union” and “Soviet” in this video. The Soviet Union was a multiethnic federation, and indeed many non-Russians bore the brunt of Hitler’s initial invasion in 1941. We regret the error — especially in reference to the Soviet soldier raising the flag in the photo, Alexei Kovalev, who is Ukrainian. Additionally, we inaccurately stated that Rosenthal’s photo was taken following the Battle of Iwo Jima. While the capture of Mt. Suribachi was a significant point in the battle, it was not the end, and in fact three of the six Marines pictured were later killed in action on Iwo Jima. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO “Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima” and “Raising a Flag over the Reichstag” are similarly iconic photos from World War II. They’re both beloved images of victory, and they’re both taken after the fighting ended in significant battles. But the Russian one is different, because parts of it are altered. Specifically, a watch being worn by one of the soldiers is edited out, to cover up the possibility that he had been looting. The Soviet invasion of Germany saw brutal acts of civilian murder, rape, and looting as a vengeful act following Operation Barbarossa, Hitler’s 1941 invasion of Russia that left millions dead, including women and children. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

2 weeks ago

How Jackson Pollock became so overrated

There’s an overlooked reason for Pollock’s fame. Even if you love him, you might not know the name of the man who made him famous. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Jackson Pollock is one of the 20th century’s most famous artists. But do you know the critic who made his reputation? Clement Greenberg is a well-known name in the art world, but not necessarily to art fans. However, he earned a reputation as one of the most influential art critics in the 20th century, whose legacy included the canonization of Jackson Pollock. Abstract expressionist art needed vocal champions to support challenging, unique work, and Greenberg was the most powerful and vocal in his defense of the art and, in particular, Jackson Pollock. Greenberg went from tie salesman to intellectual in less than a decade, thanks to strongly worded arguments for a new artform. Jackson Pollock was one of his favorite artists, and the two spent time together socially as they simultaneously climbed in the art world. Is Clement Greenberg the reason that Jackson Pollock is so famous? He’s definitely a part of it — and understanding the role of Greenberg and critics like him can be a useful tool to understanding art in the 20th century. Overrated is a series that takes a look at the things we all know — the books, the trends, and the ideas that have become iconic — and answers the question: “Why is this so famous"? Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

3 weeks ago

Why Kavanaugh's accusers can't remember everything

We expect Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh’s other accusers to perfectly remember the details of what happened to them. But that’s not how memory works, and fixating on the gaps in victims’ memories makes it harder for us to take credible allegations seriously. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In the weeks since Prof. Christine Blasey Ford accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her at a high school gathering, media coverage has focused heavily on Ford’s memories. Ford admits that she can’t remember key details about the incident, including whose house it took place at and how she got home afterward. Those gaps in her memory have led many of her critics to argue that Ford isn’t credible. Fox News in particular has seized on holes in Ford’s account to raise doubts about her allegations , even floating the theory that Ford may be confusing Kavanaugh for a doppelganger. But forgetting non-essential details is not unusual for trauma survivors. As my colleague Brian Resnick has explained, human memory is notoriously faulty. We often forget or misremember details about our experiences, even if we initially perceived them clearly. That’s especially true for trauma survivors -- like victims of sexual assault. When humans experience intense trauma, our brains have a tendency to hyper-focus on certain pieces of information while ignoring non-essential details. A victim of sexual assault might vividly remember her attacker’s cologne but struggle to remember the layout of the room she was in or what happened in the hours after the attack. Ford, for example, claims to vividly remember the “uproarious laughter” that she heard between Kavanaugh and his friend Mark Judge while she was being assaulted. In other words, critics who fixate on gaps in Ford’s memory are likely holding trauma survivors to a standard they won’t be able to meet. Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis is the director of the Culture and Trauma Lab at Pepperdine University: https://gsep.pepperdine.edu/research-training/culture-and-trauma-research/ Mary P. Koss is a Regent’s Professor at the University of Arizona: https://publichealth.arizona.edu/directory/mary-koss Read more about how rape survivors recover traumatic memories: https://arizona.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/traumatic-memory-characteristics-a-cross-validated-mediational-mo On Strikethrough, Vox producer Carlos Maza explores the challenges facing the news media in the age of Trump. Follow Carlos on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/CarlosMazaVox Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

3 weeks ago

How marketers target your nose

The quiet but powerful industry of scent branding. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Marketing is constantly begging for our attention. We’re surrounded by lights, photos, and countless advertisements everywhere we go. The constant traffic in our vision is effective, but there’s another form of marketing that’s almost too subtle to detect, and yet research has shown that it might be the most effective of all: the marketing for your nose. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

3 weeks ago

Why America needs automatic voter registration

A simple fix to get more Americans to vote. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Americans are notoriously bad at voting, but it’s not because they’re unpatriotic or lazy. It’s because most states make it really difficult to even register to vote. It’s time for the US to join other advanced democracies and implement automatic voter registration. It will make the voting system more accurate and more secure, plus it could give nearly 50 million eligible Americans a chance to decide how their country is run. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

3 weeks ago

Why colleges tolerate fraternities

Frats are... fratty. Why do colleges keep them around? Follow Overrated on Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/OverratedTheShow/ In this episode of Overrated, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the history of frats. The history of fraternities has a lot of ups and downs — and stretches all the way back to America’s founding fathers. Beyond the hazing and beer chugging, there’s a story that includes changes in higher education and even national politics. So why do colleges keep fraternities on campus? The reason is a web of incentives that make fraternities allies to administrators — despite the negatives they sometimes present. Overrated is a series that takes a look at the things we all know — the books, the trends, and the ideas that have become iconic — and answers the question: “Why is this so famous"? Watch the previous episode of Overrated: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eO92ABfq2I Watch Season 1 of Overrated here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSVlSmZWzm0&list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5elLvDjph8cAd91weWxBfyN Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

4 weeks ago

Why every social media site is a dumpster fire

Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube exploit our tribalism to keep us watching ads. That makes them a perfect target for trolls, conspiracy theorists, and con artists. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram are built to cater to the base preferences and desires of their users -- figuring out what information people enjoy with and then showing them more of it. That’s a great way to keep people online, but it also makes these platforms prime target for con artists. People are naturally drawn to inflammatory and sensational news stories, regardless of whether or not they're true. So bad actors -- conspiracy theorists, trolls, and fake news writers -- have been tremendously successful in using these platforms to spread false and divisive content that exploit people’s tribal instincts. In 2016, it was Macedonian teens making thousands of dollars publishing inflammatory fake stories about Hillary Clinton. After the Parkland shooting, it was random YouTubers going viral by accusing students of being crisis actors. Even the Russian trolls who meddled in the presidential election did so by posting low-quality, highly emotional content to social media -- content they knew would go viral. The problem with these social media sites isn’t that a few bad apples are ruining the fun. It’s that they’re designed to reward bad apples. And as long as con artists can use these platforms to prey on people’s most base desires, social media sites will continue reflecting the worst of human nature back at us. Read more of Jay Van Bevel’s work here: https://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publications/news/2018/june/jay-van-bavel-on-fake-news.html On Strikethrough, Vox producer Carlos Maza explores the challenges facing the news media in the age of Trump. Follow Carlos on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/CarlosMazaVox Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 month ago

How "Instagram traps" are changing art museums

Instagram is reshaping museums. What does that mean for art? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO There’s a new kind of art installation popping up in cities across the world. It isn’t designed to showcase classical paintings, or to house impressive historical artifacts — it’s designed to be photographed for Instagram. These might not feel like real museums, but they’re a reflection of a real change happening in the museum world right now. Museums — both new pop-ups and traditional institutions — are capitalizing on smartphone culture by creating spaces whose main appeal is being a backdrop for a great selfie. As more kinds of retail experiences move online, spaces like this — where digital reproducibility through social media is an active part of the design — are only going to get more common. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 month ago

Don't blame scooters. Blame the streets.

The sidewalks were never meant for this. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO We teamed up with the University of California to explain one of the hottest trends of 2018: dockless electric scooters. You can see more from University of California in our YouTube series Climate Lab: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HOijUtExiM&list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5fP5oq01TBp9fgh70vDDSMe&index=8 You can also read University of California's write-up on the video above here: https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/the-battle-over-scooters They’re one of many ‘micro-mobility’ innovations rocketing through the transportation sector. Even in cities with exceptional public transportation coverage, gaps persist. This is a decades old problem, often referred to as ‘the last mile/first mile.’ Cities traditionally address the last mile problem by expanding bus routes. But as cities continue to populate while transportation dept budgets dwindle, the patience of commuters is running dry. So scooters, electric skateboards, and pedal assist bikes have become an increasingly popular option for city residents. These innovations, while quite popular, also draw the ire of the oft-beleaguered sidewalk pedestrian. The past century of development prioritized car transportation, often at the expense of wide sidewalks that were once bustling with life. So the planners of today are taking a page out of history to prepare for a brave new world of alternative transportation. If you’d like to learn more about the deal with scooters in your city, I recommend following Curbed. You should start with this write-up by Alissa Walker: https://www.curbed.com/word-on-the-street/2018/7/13/17246060/scooters-uber-lyft-bird-lime-streets Here’s a closer look at the survey data on the popularity of scooters: https://www.populus.ai/micro-mobility-2018-july Here’s Sarah Kaufman on the push to regulate scooters in cities: https://wagner.nyu.edu/rudincenter/2018/06/racing-regulate-scooters-us-cities Here’s a NACTO write-up on what future complete streets could look like. https://nacto.org/publication/bau/automated-vehicles-future-city-streets/ And, just for fun, here’s that Library of Congress footage of San Francisco’s Market Street: https://www.loc.gov/item/00694408/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 month ago

Why the Ouija board became so famous

This is where Ouija boards came from. And it might surprise you. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In this episode of Overrated, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores what Ouija means, from a historical and cultural perspective. The Ouija game and Ouija movies permeate our culture. But their origin might be surprising. Before this board game was a staple, it emerged from the spiritualist movement in the United States in the mid-1800s and an aggressive entrepreneur who believed he could make a buck off of it. Ouija’s overrated — it’s not real and it’s just a piece of cardboard. But it's also a way for people from the past to speak to us (through history, at least). Overrated is a series that takes a look at the things we all know — the books, the trends, and the ideas that have become iconic — and answers the question: “Why is this so famous"? Watch the more Overrated videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSVlSmZWzm0&list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5elLvDjph8cAd91weWxBfyN Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 month ago