Vox

Vox
  • 5 minutes
  • 696 episodes
  • vox.com
  • vox
  • news
  • explain
  • ezra klein
  • politics
  • video
  • documentary

Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives, on everything from Taxes to Terrorism to Taylor Swift. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Dean Peterson, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Valerie Lapinski, Mona Lalwani, and the staff of Vox.com.

For much much more, head over to www.vox.com. And subscribe so you don't miss a video at http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

To write us: joe@vox.com.
To request permission to use our videos: permissions@voxmedia.com

Road diets: designing a safer street

Reconfigure the lanes and the traffic will calm. Subscribe to our channel!​ http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out​ http://www.vox.com​. Watch our full video catalog:​ http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook:​ http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter:​ ​http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Over the course of the 20th century, the car became America’s dominant mode of transportation. As vehicle miles travelled soared well past the rate of population growth, demands on the roadway surged. Congestion became a major issue. So transportation planners made the roads wider and added traffic lanes. Today, we now know that bigger roads and extra traffic lanes do nothing to solve congestion. In fact, it tends to induce even more traffic. So we didn’t fix the congestion issues, and on top of that, we built wide roads that are relatively unsafe. Transportation planners in the 21st century recognized that many of the roads that were overbuilt could be redesigned to calm speeding and add space for newer multimodal transportation options. And thus, the road diet was born. The video above explains why road diets are implemented, and how planners survey the feasibility of a lane reconfiguration. You can learn more about road diets with the following resources: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/research/safety/10053/10053.pdf https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/road_diets/guidance/info_guide/rdig.pdf https://nacto.org/docs/usdg/conversion_of_four_lane_undivided_urban_roadways.pdf

1 day ago

How 156 years of British rule shaped Hong Kong

Hong Kong has British DNA. Follow the Vox Borders watch page: https://www.facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Follow Johnny on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Sign up for the Vox Borders newsletter: https://www.vox.com/borders-email Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Even though Britain gave Hong Kong back to China 21 years ago, today when you walk around the city you can see British fingerprints everywhere. From statues of Queen Victoria to double decker buses, British culture and lifestyle is baked into the culture at every turn. Both the history and the current-day British influence are visually fascinating stories and in this episode I show it all -- exploring Britain’s imperial history, which includes opioid trade, discrimination and a divided city, and then showing the effects of that history, resulting in a city that is unlike any I’ve visited. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

2 days ago

One of the most surreal days in American politics

The problem is no one’s prepared to do something with the information we already have. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO We don't know everything about the Trump campaign's relationship with Russia. Nevertheless, what the public does know — especially following this summit — is pretty damning. We know that Russia and the Trump campaign whether publicly or privately explicitly or implicitly coordinated together and that Russia interfered in the election on Donald Trump's behalf. Ezra Klein breaks down why Donald Trump’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin is a remarkable, if not surreal, moment in American politics. To learn more, read Ezra’s take: https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/7/16/17573692/trump-putin-meeting-helsinki-mueller-russia You can read all of Vox.com’s coverage on the Helsinki summit here: https://www.vox.com/2018/7/13/17569978/trump-putin-meeting-helsinki-summit-russia Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

3 days ago

The (mostly) true story of hobo graffiti

What we know about hobo graffiti comes from hobos — a group that took pride in embellishing stories. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Hobos, or tramps, were itinerant workers and wanderers who, beginning in the late 19th century, illegally hopped freight cars on the then-expanding railroad in the United States. They used graffiti, or tramp writing, as a messaging system to tell their fellow travelers where they were and where they were headed next. Hobos would scratch or draw their road persona, or moniker, onto stationary objects near railroad tracks like water towers and bridges. News stories at the time, largely informed by hobos themselves, spread tales of a different kind of graffiti though. One that included coded symbols that supposedly drawn on fence posts and houses to convey simple messages to tramps about if that home or town. While this language probably existed on some level, it certainly was not as widespread as media of the time would have readers believe, and hobos as a source would have no reason to be fully truthful about the use of the symbols. Freight graffiti and monikers eventually expanded to include rail workers, who would draw their monikers on the boxcars coming through train yards.

4 days ago

How your split ends can help clean oil spills

Hair isn’t just for top knots; it can protect the ocean too. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO While oil spills have declined over the years, they still happen, and when they do, it can be devastating to the environment. One natural way to help contain oil spills is through the use of hair booms and hair mats. Hair is a naturally hydrophobic and biosorbent, which means, it repels water and can collect heavy metals and other contaminants, like oil. The more popular methods to contain oil spills use synthetic materials and chemicals, which can be costly and just as dangerous to environment. So, it’s worth exploring eco-friendly ways to clean up the ocean and other waterways. You can learn more about how hair-booms and hair mats can be used during oil spills on Matter of Trust’s website: https://matteroftrust.org/297/clean-wave-program Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 week ago

Why seeking asylum in America is so difficult

America has led the world in refugee resettlement for 15 years, but asylum cases have pushed political tempers to a tipping point. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Asylum is one way that refugees come to America. If you’ve already fled your home country for fear of persecution, and come to the United States, but don’t have refugee status, applying for asylum is the next step you take. It’s a small subset of the American immigration system, but it’s the mechanism behind so much of the news about border. Families recently separated from their children at the border came seeking asylum. People fleeing from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador — an area known as the Northern Triangle — come to the United States seeking asylum. To even get a hearing before an immigration judge, potential asylum-seekers have to prove that they have what’s called “credible fear” of returning home. And this is where that backlog really begins. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 week ago

Vox Borders Hong Kong starts next week

Every Wednesday, starting 7/18/18, see a new side of Hong Kong. Follow the Vox Borders watch page: https://www.facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Follow Johnny on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Sign up for the Vox Borders newsletter: https://www.vox.com/borders-email Hong Kong sits on one of the world’s most peculiar borders. It’s a part of China but it’s also very much an independent entity. Every Wednesday for five weeks, Vox’s Johnny Harris goes behind the scenes in Hong Kong, talking to the locals and showcasing some of the interesting culture that emerged in this nexus between East and West. Watch season 1 of Vox Borders: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5eYGt47YpJcNhILyYLmV-tW Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 week ago

Bees can understand zero. Can you?

Zero is a mysterious and powerful number. Let’s not take it for granted. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The number is a relatively new invention in the history of humans. And that is because zero isn’t intuitive for our brains to grasp. It has to be learned. But how we seized zero and forged it into a tool is still a mind-bending mystery. New research suggests the ability to fathom zero may be more widespread than previously thought in the animal kingdom. Australian scientists were able to teach bees to recognize zero as a quantity less than one, a task that confounds most human children under the age of 6. The result is kind of astounding, considering how tiny bee brains are. Watch the video above to learn how scientists taught bees to recognize zero. Learn more about the weirdness of the number zero here: https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/7/5/17500782/zero-number-math-explained If you want more bee-utiful videos, check out this one from our sister channel, Verge Science: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PNqVilJESg Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

1 week ago

Why France produces the most World Cup players

And some of the best. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO France has had the most native players and coaches in the last 4 World Cups… and their dominance has been on the rise. Players like Kylian Mbappe and Paul Pogba are the children of immigrants and the product of the French soccer academy system. French- born players have played for Togo, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Argentina, Portugal, and many more. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

2 weeks ago

Why the US national anthem is terrible — and perfect

Vox's Estelle Caswell and Joss Fong debate "The Star Spangled Banner" Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When Francis Scott Key attached his poem about the War of 1812 to a popular British song called "To Anacreon in Heaven," he kicked off over 200 years of painfully bad singing by patriotic Americans. The Star Spangled Banner became the official national anthem of the United States in 1931, but it had been used by the Army and Navy for decades before that and was popular from the start. One big problem? The melody wasn't exactly written for the masses, but for trained soloists. Commentators pointed out early on that it was exceedingly difficult for most people to sing, suggesting that "America the Beautiful" might be a better alternative. Critics have noted that the music requires a uniquely wide vocal range, it's full of tricky intervals, and the lyrics are confusing and uninspiring. But if you look at the national anthem as a sport, where we get to watch performers at the top of their game tackle the gauntlet that is the Star Spangled Banner, you may come to appreciate it. In this video, we debate whether the difficulty of the Star Spangled Banner is a feature or a bug for a national anthem. Further reading: Star-Spangled Banner: The Unlikely Story of America's National Anthem https://www.amazon.com/Star-Spangled-Banner-Unlikely-Americas-National/dp/1421415186 Star Spangled Music: http://starspangledmusic.org/ Slate: Proudly Hailed http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/music_box/2014/07/the_star_spangled_banner_four_reasons_it_shouldn_t_be_the_national_anthem.html Emily Cope: https://medium.com/@emilybcope/music-to-what-extent-does-the-star-spangled-banner-illustrate-how-melody-and-rhythm-influence-the-aff2c78853ed Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

2 weeks ago

How one typeface took over movie posters

Why Hollywood kept using Trajan. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For the past 25 years, one typeface has dominated Hollywood typography: Trajan. It’s everywhere, from Shakespearean epic classics like Titus to gory modern flicks like The Human Centipede. It was even the official typeface of the Academy Awards for a while. In movie poster design, if you want to make a film look official, you use Trajan. So how did that happen? Designer Yves Peters set out to answer that question. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

3 weeks ago

Can Trump really pardon himself?

We asked legal experts about the limits of a president’s pardoning power. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Take a look at the US Constitution and you’ll find that the president has fairly broad power to pardon individuals accused, charged or convicted of crimes against the federal government. President Trump’s use of pardons early in his presidency, some believe, sends signals to his allies that Trump is willing to pardon them if they’re convicted of a crime in one of the several investigations surrounding the 2016 elections. The president has also repeatedly claimed that he could even pardon himself. So what are the checks to a US president’s pardoning power and what does the Constitution have to say about this sort of self-serving pardoning? Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

3 weeks ago

It's not you. Date labels on food make no sense.

Food labels don’t mean what you think they mean. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When people clean out their fridge, they look at whatever date is on the label and throw it in the trash if it’s past that date. But the chances are that you’re throwing out tons of perfectly good food because date labels on food are often really confusing. Food labels can mean many different things and often don’t give you any indication of whether the food is safe to eat or not. Many people assume that they’re federally regulated, but baby formula is the only product required to have consistent date labels. For everything else it’s up to the states to decide. This creates a confusing state-by-state patchwork of labels with everything from “use by” to “freshest before” to “sell by” to “packaged on.” And all this confusion causes us to waste tons of food every year. All the uneaten food waste costs Americans over $200 billion each year, and two thirds of that comes from households. If we came up with a unified, easy to understand date label system we could save money, food, and help the environment, all just by changing how we put date labels on the things we eat. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

4 weeks ago

Why Americans suck at soccer (well, the men)

We’ve got a theory, and it involves the soccer wars. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Watch the SB Nation video about the 1999 US Women's World Cup team here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nbt6Hb-2X8k And subscribe to SB Nation on YouTube! https://goo.gl/Nbabae In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards puts forth a theory about terrible American men’s soccer. There are a lot of reasons Americans suck at soccer - but if you look at the history, you’ll find a surprisingly compelling explanation for why American soccer never took off. In the 1920s, soccer was a surprisingly successful sport in the US, with massive matches and a robust league. What went wrong? American soccer and English football first diverged in the 1800s, when American colleges like Harvard and Yale started playing a more rugby-like game. But America quickly caught up with soccer in the 1920s, attracting large crowds and even stealing away European players. Then the soccer wars happened. Constant battles in the 1920s between the ASL - American Soccer League - and USFA — United States Football Association — carved up American soccer’s cash, fans, and talent. By the time the depression hit, American soccer was so weakened that it couldn’t rebound as well as European and South American soccer culture did. The subsequent half-century of sports build up gave Americans a permanent handicap when it came to building a robust soccer culture. It’s a theory — but the success of the US Women’s National Team bears out the idea that something is specifically wrong for the men. And it just might be the case that 1920s soccer wars are the reason. Read about the own-goal that made the US Men's National Team miss the 2018 World Cup: https://www.theringer.com/2018/6/5/17428184/2018-world-cup-us-soccer-inside-story-jurgen-klinsmann-sunil-gulati-bruce-arena Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

4 weeks ago

How Islamist militant groups are gaining strength in Africa

Terrorist groups are destabilizing countries all over the continent. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Islamist terrorist groups have found a new home and it's not in the Middle East -- it's in Africa. Specifically, the Sahel, a band of territory in West Africa between the Sahara desert and the savannah. Since the early 2000s, Islamist extremist groups have increasingly strengthened their base here -- training fighters, raising money, and launching a massive number of attacks. Some are linked to al-Qaeda and other Islamic State. This is throwing these already weak countries into crises and making the region one of the most dangerous in the world. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 month ago

The voices of children separated at the border

Over 2,300 children have been separated from their families. Read ProPublica reporter Ginger Thompson’s article here: https://www.propublica.org/article/children-separated-from-parents-border-patrol-cbp-trump-immigration-policy And listen to the full audio clip at ProPublica’s YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoncXfYBAVI&t=70s In April 2018, the Trump administration and Attorney General Jeff Sessions instituted a “zero tolerance” policy on undocumented immigration. Undocumented migrants and asylum seekers detained at the border now face immediate criminal prosecution, often before their asylum claims can even be processed. Thousands of children and other migrants are now being held in detention centers operated by US Customs and Border Protection, where they await trial. A backlash against this policy is growing, with conservatives and liberals alike decrying it as cruel and inhumane. Both the White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Sessions have explicitly cited the policy as a preemptive deterrent to undocumented migration, though the administration has since backtracked on that message. We want to help shed light on this. Has your family been separated at the US–Mexico border? Are you a worker at a detention center, or do you aid families who have been affected? Tell us more at border@propublica.org or 347-244-2134. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Subscribe to the ProPublica newsletter: http://go.propublica.org/weekly

1 month ago

How TV gave us the classic soccer ball

The 2018 World Cup football is a nod back to an iconic design. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Learn more about how the World Cup works and the schedule for this year’s tournament here: https://www.vox.com/2018/6/12/17356780/world-cup-2018-russia-teams-schedule-tickets And if want more coverage of the 2018 World Cup, you can find our reporting on Vox.com: https://www.vox.com/world/2018/6/13/17460054/world-cup-2018-fifa-russia When you think of a soccer ball, you probably imagine a classic black-and-white paneled ball. It’s known as the Telstar ball, and it was created thanks to TV. The 1966 World Cup in England was broadcast live across the globe and it was at this point that television became a huge part of the sport. Thanks to the BBC, it was seen by four hundred million people. But spotting the ball was a bit challenging. Back then, soccer balls looked more like reddish-brown volleyballs. And on black-and-white TVs, it didn’t really stand out from the green field. By the 1970 World Cup, the soccer ball had changed to that classic Telstar. The contrasting panels made it stand out on TV. Plus, the players loved it because the 32 panels brought the ball closer to an actual sphere. This year’s World Cup ball is called the Telstar 18, a nod to the original design. While the panels have changed to just six propeller-shaped pieces to make the ball even more spherical, the black-and-white checkered design is back. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 month ago

Dungeons and Dragons, explained

Why we love this nerdy role-playing fantasy game. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In an age of virtual reality, video games, and smartphones, more and more people are getting into this magical, nerdy tabletop fantasy role-playing game. Here’s why you should play Dungeons & Dragons, too. If you want to learn more about D&D, here are my (Carlos M) recommendations: Great D&D weekly livestream: Critical Role https://geekandsundry.com/shows/critical-role/ Great D&D podcast: Dungeon Rats http://neonrival.com/thedungeonrats/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 month ago

How did quietness become a sign of quality? [Advertiser content from 3M]

Absolute silence doesn't actually exist in nature. Even in the quietest of spaces, there’s still wind blowing, air conditioners humming, and birds chirping. But there's also a huge field of study devoted to quietness. Go inside a Minnesota facility that's devoted to studying the science of silence and find out how silence actually became golden. Paid content presented by 3M: https://www.vox.com/ad/17417806/history-silence-noise-headphones-anechoic-chamber Vox Creative - https://www.youtube.com/voxcreative Confused about branded content? The Vox Video team explains here: https://youtu.be/FpKY9KaZJC0?t=5m6s

1 month ago

What does “denuclearization” mean?

It depends on which country you ask. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Read our analysis on the winners and losers from the US-North Korea summit here: https://www.vox.com/2018/6/12/17450974/trump-kim-jong-un-summit-winners And if you need to catch up the ongoing events between Trump and Kim Jong Un, you can find our reporting on Vox.com: https://www.vox.com/world/2018/6/6/17431264/trump-kim-jong-un-north-korea-summit President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un struck a historic deal to work toward “complete denuclearization” of the Korean Peninsula. The trouble is they don’t have a shared vision of what “complete denuclearization” looks like. And while handshakes were exchanged and agreements were signed after unprecedented talks in Singapore, no country with a nuclear program as advanced as North Korea's has ever denuclearized. Vox is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

1 month ago