NowThis World

NowThis World
  • 3 minutes
  • 1179 episodes
  • now this now this news nowthis nowthis world
  • world
  • globe
  • international
  • international news

NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Check back in for new videos every Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday at 9am ET.

Inside the First Palestinian Museum in the U.S. | NowThis World

Faisal Saleh is a Palestinian immigrant in the United States and founder of the first permanent Palestinian museum in the U.S. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://go.nowth.is/2EI5pcS The Palestinian museum serves as a space for education and elevation of Palestinian art rather than war and conflict. The Palestinian museum defies the traditional Western narrative of the Palestinian story by acting as a space for celebration of cultural life rather than political divide. Saleh's parents left Salama during Israel's War of Independence, eventually settling in the West Bank town of El Bireh, near Ramallah. At the age of 18, in 1969, two years after the 1967 war, Saleh moved to the United States, studied at Oberlin College, earned his M.B.A. from the University of Connecticut, and became an entrepreneur. Hundreds of photos, paintings and sculptures by some of the most prominent Palestinian artists are proudly displayed at his museum, including pieces from Gaza, Jordan, Lebanon, and Ramallah. Saleh has managed this despite the obstacles of shipping art from occupied territories like Gaza and West Bank. Saleh is financing the museum himself, but he said he hopes to eventually attract enough financial support to relocate the gallery from its suburban, turnpike setting to major cities across the U.S. #Palestine #FaisalSaleh #MiddleEast #Gaza #WestBank Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

1 day ago

The Precipitous Fall of Paul Manafort Explained | The Russia Desk | NowThis World

Paul Manafort was one of the president’s top campaign officials and a long-time confidant. So what inspired the former lobbyist to flip on the president and plead guilty to conspiracy? » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://go.nowth.is/2QZLHKX After months of fighting, Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort has pled guilty to one count of conspiracy against the U.S. and one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice for his efforts to tamper with witnesses as part of a grueling FBI investigation led by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. The Mueller investigation essentially found Paul Manafort indirectly guilty of collusion in the 2016 presidential election with Russia in support of Trump and against Hillary Clinton. Paul Manafort has completely flipped on President Trump since he got started on the Trump campaign, and now he's agreed to cooperate with the FBI and Robert Mueller's investigation into the Russians and Vladimir Putin's influence on the 2016 presidential election. In the 5 months Paul Manafort worked for the Trump campaign, several possible criminal events occurred, including the Trump Tower meeting in which Manafort and Don Jr. met with Russians. But former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort's ties with the Kremlin go back even further. Paul Manafort and right wing Infowars host Roger Stone opened a lobbying firm in the early '80s that had a lot of ties to Washington, and Trump was introduced to Manafort and Stone through his close friend and mentor Roy Cohn. Later on, Paul Manafort went on to work in the Ukraine for pro-Russian politician Viktor Yanukovych, who later became President Yanukovych. Fast forward to October 2017, when Special Counsel Mueller announced charges against Paul Manafort, Rick Gates, and George Papadopoulos, and provided evidence that the Trump campaign coordinated with the Russian government to obtain damaging info on Hillary Clinton. #PaulManafort #DonaldTrump #USpolitics #RobertMueller #HillaryClinton #worldnews #Russia Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

6 days ago

The Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi | NowThis World

The October 2nd disappearance of a prominent Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi shocked the world. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://go.nowth.is/2NEviJJ The last place Khashoggi was seen was at the Saudi Arabian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. He entered, but reportedly never left. Now, over a week later, little is still known about Jamal Khashoggi's whereabouts. Officials from Turkey now fear the worst. They worry that the Saudis murdered the Saudi journalist after he entered its diplomatic station. Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post journalist and exiled Saudi critic, wasn't always a critic of the Saudi government. In fact, he had a history of working very closely with the Saudi government even serving as an adviser to senior Saudi officials for a time. Despite his close relationship with the Saudi royal family, his vocal support for reforms often got him in trouble - even forced out from newsroom leadership positions in Saudi Arabia on several occasions. He advocated for equal rights for women, criticized the kingdom's crackdown on human rights activists, and called for greater press freedoms. That was especially true after the new crown prince Mohammad Bin Salman took control. Jamal Khashoggi fled Saudi Arabia in September, 2017 and went into self-imposed exile in the United States. And Khashoggi became even more outspoken in his exile. He began writing for The Washington Post, where he openly criticized Saudi Arabia's military campaign in Yemen, as well as Mohammed Bin Salman's leadership. But is this what lead to the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi? We explore all of this further in this week's episode of NowThis World. #JamalKhashoggi #SaudiArabia #WashingtonPost #politics #DonaldTrump Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

1 week ago

War in Afghanistan: 17 Years Later | NowThis World

After 17 years long, the war in Afghanistan is now considered the longest-running war in U.S. history. But why did the United States invade Afghanistan in the first place, and is anyone winning this war? » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/HPAONq36HKg The war in Afghanistan is now 17 years old - making the Afghanistan war the longest-running war in United States history. To put that number into perspective, young Americans can now enlist to fight in a war that began before they were even born. The war in Afghanistan that was started under President Bush and continued under President Obama, is now in the hands of President Trump -- who's taken a drastically different approach to the Afghanistan war than his predecessor. And making sense of Trump's Afghanistan war strategy and the us forces in Afghanistan has been on the minds of many. Trump, who said his initial instinct was to pull out of Afghanistan, had a change of heart when sworn into office. And instead of reducing U.S. involvement, he increased it. The Taliban resurgence now threatens large parts of Afghanistan, an ISIS-linked group has emerged, and civilian deaths are expected to rise this year, Nearly two decades after the United States invaded the country following the September 11th attacks. According to the UN, in 2017 over 10,000 civilians were killed or injured as a result of the conflict. And it fears this year's war injuries Afghanistan number will be considerably higher. Many people have lost their lives and millions have been forced to flee their homes, since the beginning of the war in Afghanistan. And the financial cost of this war is upwards of a trillion dollars, according to some estimates. So why is there war in Afghanistan and why did the United States invade Afghanistan in the first place? Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

2 weeks ago

The Problem With the UN Veto Power | NowThis World

The permanent 5 members of the UN Security Council have a unique power. It's their right to veto. But how has it's implementation failed to address humanitarian crises around the world? » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/sEKQYYhp3eE Though even the United Nation's fiercest critics admit the UN has done a lot of good around the world, the United Nations has also been accused of being complicit in corruption, tangled in bureaucracy, and increasingly reactive rather than proactive in addressing the world's crises. It's also been accused of failing to act to prevent genocides in places including Rwanda in 1994, Bosnia in 1995, and Darfur, Sudan in the early 2000s. Some have even called the United Nations Security Council permanent 5 void of power and totally powerless. But there are certain countries in the UN (United States, United Kingdom, Russia, France, China) that get to exercise real power. We're talking about the UN Security Council's Permanent 5 members or P5. They all have what's known as the right to veto. And while some permanent members, like France and the UK, are more open to expansion, Russia, China and the U.S. have been more cautious or directly opposed. It would take a whole lot of support to modify the UN Charter, and to get all five P5 members to agree at the same time to restrict their own power. But despite of all its flaws, experts generally agree: the UN creates a vital space for diplomacy, mediation, and maintaining international peace. It has indisputably helped save lives, lifted people out of poverty and starvation and maintained global order. So we're going to break down what is veto power, how the P5 got this power. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

3 weeks ago

Why Russian Teens Were Jailed for Chatting Online | The Russia Desk | NowThis World

These two Russian teens are facing up to 5 years in prison for “inciting extremism” simply by sharing memes online. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/Vjfyqtz4_wc People can be arrested for liking or sharing posts that insult religious sensitivities, such as one meme that depicted Game of Thrones' Jon Snow (played by actor Kit Harington) as Jesus. In the past year, 604 people have been arrested, most of whom are under the age of 25. One major case involves a group called 'The New Greatness' which formed on the social media app Telegram, essentially Russia's equivalent to Facebook. 'The New Greatness' became a political opposition group that the Russian government called an extremist community. The extremism and organizing began when a man who called himself 'Ruslan D' joined the group. After protesting led to ten arrests, the only detail authorities could uncover about Ruslan D was his 'real' name: Alexander Konstantinov. But was that actually his real name at all? Here's what you need to know. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha ‘The Russia Desk’ is a series about everything Russia: from Vladimir Putin’s government to the Russian people and culture, to its history with the United States. If you’re curious about Trump, Putin, Crimea, Syria, borscht, dashcams, sanctions, or more, this is the place for you. There’s a lot of misinformation out there about Russia, its government, and its sphere of influence — including U.S. elections. ‘The Russia Desk’ aims to separate fact from fiction with expert interviews, original analysis, and on-the-ground reporting. Pee tape not guaranteed. NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

3 weeks ago

Happiest Countries In The World: Explained | NowThis World

Each year, the official World Happiness Report tells us which countries are the ‘happiest’ — so who gets to decide what the ‘good life’ looks like? » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/1oDyQP5Ycgw Let's talk about happy countries. Today, we're breaking down the annual World Happiness Report, to explain which countries are the happiest countries in the world and why. When we look at global rankings, we're often talking about things like purchasing power, military resources, trade partnerships. But some experts say happiness is actually a better indicator of development and public policy successes than other factors. The World Happiness Report - now in its sixth year - is produced by a UN initiative called the Sustainable Development Solutions Network. They've managed to break down a topic that's both fundamentally subjective and hard to quantify. Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, and Finland, the Nordic countries, are in the top ten. And they've all ranked among the top 10 since the report was first put out. And Switzerland - this year's #5 - has also always hovered near the top also. So what are the factors (people, resources, education, social services, income, unemployment, gdp) that rank the Nordic countries among the happiest countries in the world? We spoke to an economist, John Helliwell, who has edited the reports since the beginning. He said the data were compiled from the World Gallup poll, wherein people were asked to value their lives as a whole, with the best possible life being a 10 and the worst possible being a 0. Of course, a countries happiness is subjective and hard to quantify. And just because a country makes it onto the ""Happiest countries"" list, doesn't mean they're free of problems or criticism. For example, the Nordic countries have been among those witnessing a rise of far-right political parties and nationalist anti-immigrant sentiment after the European migrant crisis began in 2015. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

4 weeks ago

UN General Assembly 2018 – 5 Key Global Issues | NowThis World

These are the five key global issues you should keep an eye on during this year’s 2018 UN General Assembly (UNGA 73). » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe Watch More: » The Rohingya & Why They're Fleeing: https://youtu.be/hUQRpggli74 » South Sudan's Hunger Crisis: https://youtu.be/VDKNMgKZoRk » Why the U.S. is in Yemen: https://youtu.be/lqwFsao_EsM The 73rd general assembly of united nations officially starts this week. The general assembly is supposed to be the place where the leaders of the world assemble to discuss key global issues of our time -- the ones that affect people around the world. But as previous years have shown, sometimes the things that make the headlines during the general assembly of united nations, are not the very issues that need to be addressed the most at the UN general assembly. The United Nations and others have already condemned many atrocities around the world. Now they'll have another opportunity to use their voice again. As the general assembly of the united nations gathers, pay attention to what most powerful leaders in the world 2018 will say, or not say, about some of the most important world issues of today. In today's episode we've compiled five key global issues we think you should keep an eye on during this general assembly 2018. Who will get called out and what are some other world issues you think need to take center stage at this year's UNGA? Here's a list of some people, places or issues that might make the biggest headlines at this year's unga: Donald Trump; Aung San Suu Kyi; Mohammed Bin Salman; Saudi Arabia; Salva Kiir; Riek Machar; China; United States; Myanmar; South Sudan; Sudan; Yemen; rohingya; Uyghur muslims; Xi Jinping, family separation, Syria, mass migration, ethnic cleansing, genocide, Israel, Palestine, refugees. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

1 month ago

Russian Interference In The U.S. 2018 Midterm Elections | The Russia Desk | NowThis World

Phishing, hacking, and misinformation — here are some of the ways that Russian-backed actors have undertaken a campaign to influence the 2018 midterm elections. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/YgpDucwJAqU Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha ‘The Russia Desk’ is a series about everything Russia: from Vladimir Putin’s government to the Russian people and culture, to its history with the United States. If you’re curious about Trump, Putin, Crimea, Syria, borscht, dashcams, sanctions, or more, this is the place for you. There’s a lot of misinformation out there about Russia, its government, and its sphere of influence — including U.S. elections. ‘The Russia Desk’ aims to separate fact from fiction with expert interviews, original analysis, and on-the-ground reporting. Pee tape not guaranteed. NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

1 month ago

Pope Francis: The Controversial Catholic Leader | NowThis World

Pope Francis is facing bombshell allegations that have put the papacy directly in the crosshairs of a potential scandal. But the Catholic Pope isn't new to being at the center of controversies with the Catholic church. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/lqwFsao_EsM Born Jorge Mario Bergoglio in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1936 - Catholic Pope Francis was the son of Italian immigrants who fled the fascist dictatorship of Benito Mussolini. Bergoglio dedicated his life to the Roman Catholic church in 1958 when he joined the novitiate of the Society of Jesus. Fast forward to March 13, 2013 -- a billow of white smoke rose above the Sistine Chapel. That was the moment Jorge Mario Bergoglio, became known as Pope Francis. Pope Francis became the 266th leader of the Roman Catholic church. His leadership would bring in a new wave of firsts for the Vatican. Pope Francis was the first pope from Latin America, the first Jesuit, and first non-European in over 1,000 years. He said he wanted to shift the church's priority to helping the poor and marginalized. Pope Francis was seen as a reformer, someone who wanted to push the Catholic church forward. He's made relatively supportive comments about the LGBTQ community in 2013, saying quote "If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?" He's warned of the growing dangers of climate change, argued that the death penalty is "inadmissible," and gave priests the right to "forgive abortions," a medical procedure that would have automatically resulted in the excommunication from the church. But these signs of change didn't sit well with some conservatives in the church. In today's episode, we're going to explore some of the controversies of Pope Francis' past, and the recent allegations that might leave some to ask, will pope Francis resign? Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

1 month ago

Why is the U.S. in Yemen? | NowThis World

The United Nations has called the conflict in Yemen "the worst humanitarian crisis" in the world today. Here's how the U.S. is a part of the problem. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/haPnUDM9pdU In Yemen on August 9, 2018 -- young boys boarded a school bus for what was meant to be a daylong field trip filled with excitement. But that day of fun, soon turned into a day of horror and tragedy as they became the latest victims of a Saudi Yemen war. A Saudi Arabia led military coalition dropped a 500 pound laser guided bomb on the bus killing about 51 Yemeni people and injuring about 79 other people. The horrific images that emerged from the scene of the attack not only drew the world's attention to the Yemen civil war and the Yemen airstrikes, but also to the international partnerships that are supporting Saudi Arabia's relentless bombardment of its neighbor to the south. Especially after subsequent reporting revealed that the bomb used in the Yemen raid might have been supplied by the United States. The Yemen conflict has created what the United Nations has called ""the worst humanitarian crisis"" in the world today. Conservative estimates say that this war has resulted in death of at least 5,000 civilians, created a famine in the country that claimed the lives of about 50,000 people, pushed 8.4 million Yemenis to the brink of starvation, and sparked a cholera epidemic that has affected more than 1 million people. This recent conflict in Yemen began with Yemen's civil war, which launched out of the instability that followed a popular uprising in 2011. Currently, Yemen is in the midst of the Yemen civil war which launched out of the instability that followed a popular uprising in 2011. By September 2014, an Iranian-backed group called the Houthis gained control of large parts of Yemen, including its capital Sana'a. And in March 2015 a Saudi Arabian and United Arab Emirate-led military coalition began an airstrike campaign against Houthi targets in the country. And the U.S. has been supporting the Saudi-led coalition since 2015. On this week's episode of NowThis World, Judah is going to look into this horrific attack and the role that the U.S. continues to play in Yemen. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

1 month ago

The Rise of Pakistan's Imran Khan | NowThis World

Imran Khan, cricket superstar. Imran Khan, playboy. Imran Khan Pakistan Politician. Khan has been called many things. But now he's earned a new title. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://go.nowth.is/2o91xpU Imran Khan new prime minister, then-captain of the Pakistan national cricket team led his team to an unprecedented victory for the country. It was Pakistan's first and only World Cup win to date - and a moment of extreme pride for its citizens. Prime Minister Khan, who was already a celebrated cricketer throughout the '70s and '80s, saw his celebrity status skyrocket even further. Beloved both at home and in the West, he had an active and public social and love life - his marriage to British heiress in 1995 making international news. He also made headlines as a philanthropist, fundraising millions of dollars to open a cancer hospital for low-income patients in honor of his late mother in December, 1994. It was around this time - a few years after the World Cup victory - that speculation about Khan's leadership potential started popping up, and it was rumored was he was setting his sights on a political career. Soon he would outline what would become his core issue for 22 years: ridding Pakistani politics of corruption. And in 1996, he made it official: founding the Pakistan [Teh-reek - eh- In-saf] Tehreek-e-Insaf, or PTI party. Also referred to as the "Movement for Justice," the party was branded as an anti-corruption socio-political movement, aiming to create a quote "self-reliant modern Islamic Republic." But for almost two decades, PTI Imran Khan's party saw few victories. So how did this former sports star he end up securing the highest political position in a country of almost 200 million people? In this episode of NowThis World, Alex Janin breaks it down. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

1 month ago

Will India's Supreme Court Decriminalize Gay Sex? | NowThis World

As India’s Supreme Court is challenged to decriminalize gay sex, the world is watching to see if it will be a win for LGBTQ+ rights or if the country will remain stuck in the past. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/A41XXPtl1XM In India, the fate of millions hang in the balance. Their Supreme Court is currently deciding whether it will scrap one of the world's oldest laws that criminalizes gay sex. Many say Section 377 has stripped millions of gay people of their dignity and privacy and has also created a hostile environment where gay and transgender people fear reporting things like sexual harassment or assault -- because they fear they too will be arrested, even if they are the victims. But it's important to note that same-sex relations weren't always this taboo in India. For much of its pre- colonial history, the country remained rather relaxed when it came to depictions of same-sex love and gender identity. But that acceptance eventually eroded due to British colonialism. Section 377 can be traced back to other British laws that policed morality. It began with the Buggery Act of 1533 in the United Kingdom. That law was enacted under King Henry the 8th and outlawed things like anal sex and bestiality, and essentially outlawed sexual relations between men as a whole. If someone was found guilty under this law, it would be punishable by death. In this episode of NowThis World Judah Robinson will explore the history of this outdated law and what it's meant for the LGBTQ community India. Other countries like the United States, Nepal, Canada, and more, have all overturned similar laws that criminalize homosexuality. Could it be India's turn to take this step? Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

2 months ago

Which Countries Have 'Marry-Your-Rapist' Laws? | NowThis World

Did you know that laws still exist around the world today that exonerate alleged and convicted rapists if they marry their victims? » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the previous episode: https://go.nowth.is/2ntsDYu Protests have cropped up in countries around the world, from Turkey to Lebanon to Morocco. According to the World Bank, the Philippines, Algeria, Bahrain, Iraq, Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Kuwait, Libya, & Syria, have legal provisions stipulating that the perpetrator of rape or sexual assault can escape punishment by marrying the victim There are also variations of these laws that exist in other parts of the world - for example, in Greece, Russia, Serbia, and Thailand an alleged rapist can avoid prosecution if the victim is underage, and in Singapore, Romania, Thailand and Turkey, if the victim "forgives" him. These laws were back in the news recently after Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas repealed that state's version of the legislation. It was a huge step forward, and came not long after a wave of other countries in the region did the same. But there are still countries around the world with different variations of these laws still in place - and though the majority exist in the Middle East and Africa, the West isn't exempt. In fact, the legislation largely draws its roots to a 19th century French code. So what countries still have these archaic laws? In this episode of NowThis World Alex Janin is looking into these laws - how they came to be, how they're still hurting women, and whether the problem stops with repealing them. Though variations of these laws have mostly died out in the West - Human Rights Watch researcher Rothna Begum says they largely originated from the French Napoleonic Code of 1810, which stated that if the kidnapper "married the girl whom he has stolen," the family could waive his criminal prosecution. Watch this video and find out more! Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

2 months ago

How Corrupt Was Cambodia's Election? | NowThis World

Cambodia just had a major election, but there wasn't much suspense involved. The outcome of the Cambodia election 2018, as expected, was declared a win for authoritarian Prime Minister Hun Sen, who has been in power for over 33 years. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://go.nowth.is/2LOewM2 This was the 6th general Cambodia election since the UN sponsored the country's free and fair vote in 1993, but some analysts say that the more elections that have been held, the more authoritarian the Hun Sen has become. Journalists and human rights groups say Cambodia is sliding into a full-fledged dictatorship. And we spoke to an expert on authoritarian regimes and democratization in Southeast Asia who says the country is already there. In this episode of NowThis World, Versha, will be exploring Cambodia news and the question: how did Cambodia and the Cambodia people get here? But before we look at the latest Cambodia election, we will need to understand who Hun Sen is. So we first explore the world's longest currently-serving Prime Minister, Hun Sen, who first came to power in 1985, but was a political figure in the country years before that. A series of twists and turns in the Cambodian power structure eventually landed him in the right place at the right time. In the past year, the Cambodian election crackdown and the crackdown on human rights has escalated. In addition to eliminating the major opposition party, major independent newspapers have been forced to close, in order to silence critical reporting. So, now that the Cambodian People's Party has taken another victory, what's next for Hun Sen and the country? Hun Sen has committed to staying Prime Minister for at least another decade, and reportedly he's also been grooming his sons to take over when the time comes. But as the younger, more educated generation grows increasingly disillusioned with Hun Sen's authoritarian rule, could a mass protest reasonably overthrow the government? Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

2 months ago

Pussy Riot's World Cup Protest Explained | The Russia Desk | NowThis World

If it wasn’t for Pussy Riot, President Putin would’ve gotten through the whole World Cup without any meaningful acts of resistance. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/ZU1zhbi6x_c Who are Pussy Riot and how did they come to be the only people to make a meaningful political statement during the 2018 Russia World Cup? NowThis host and correspondent, Versha Sharma, joins Pussy Riot’s Masha Alyokhina to discuss the World Cup protest and the importance of taking action in a heated political climate. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha ‘The Russia Desk’ is a series about everything Russia: from Vladimir Putin’s government to the Russian people and culture, to its history with the United States. If you’re curious about Trump, Putin, Crimea, Syria, borscht, dashcams, sanctions, or more, this is the place for you. There’s a lot of misinformation out there about Russia, its government, and its sphere of influence — including U.S. elections. ‘The Russia Desk’ aims to separate fact from fiction with expert interviews, original analysis, and on-the-ground reporting. Pee tape not guaranteed. NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

2 months ago

One of Africa’s Longest Wars Ends | NowThis World

One of Africa’s longest running conflicts, the Ethiopia and Eritrea war, has officially ended. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/t9bXIMhEQJ4 The east African nations of Ethiopia and Eritrea border dispute was ended and a new era of Eritrea and Ethiopia peace was ushered in on July 9th, 2018. It was a decades-long conflict that had a huge human cost and severely damaged Eritrea and Ethiopia relations. The declaration of peace wasn’t just symbolic either, it had immediate real life consequences for people on both sides of the border. Diplomatic relations were restored, flights between the countries resumed, and even phone lines opened up allowing people in each country to call each other for the first time in two decades. In April 2018, Abiy Ahmed came to power in Ethiopia. The 41-year-old is one of Africa’s youngest leaders and has made a few reforms since gaining power. He pardoned political prisoners, and rolled back censorship of over 200 websites, blogs and television stations. But the most shocking of them all, was Ahmed’s announcement that he would “fully accept and implement” the 2000 Peace Treaty with Eritrea, officially ending a war that he had even fought in himself. And Eritrea’s Isaias Afwerki was on board. On July 9th, 2018 in Eritrea’s capital Asmara, the two leaders released a joint statement saying they were QUOTE, “Determined to close this very costly chapter, which also had a detrimental role in the Horn of Africa, and to make up for lost opportunities and create even bigger golden opportunities for their peoples.” In this episode of NowThis World we’re going to explore the complicated history between these two countries and what led to the end of this conflict. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

2 months ago

Beyond the Driving Ban in Saudi Arabia | NowThis World

Women in Saudi Arabia finally get to take their place behind the wheel. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://go.nowth.is/2uCADKH In this episode of NowThis World, Alex Janin explores what was the last ban on women driving in the world, as she speaks to a human rights campaigner and a Saudi lawyer and entrepreneur - who recently got her own license - about how this move affects women, and whether more reforms are on the horizon. A lot of people are handing the credit to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who has been hailed by prominent figures in Western Media as a reformer, emancipator of women, and more. But we wanted to know - does his track record live up to the praise? #SaudiArabia #DrivingBan #MohammedbinSalman Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

3 months ago

Nelson Mandela's Legacy In South Africa Today | NowThis World

For the 100th anniversary of Nelson Mandela’s birth, we’re exploring the everlasting impact he's had on the world. Nelson Mandela spent almost 3 decades of his life in prison fighting to end apartheid. Here’s a look at his legacy in South Africa and around the world. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/VDKNMgKZoRk Nelson Mandela, hailed by many as the father of modern South Africa, was the first black and democratically elected President in the country. In this episode of NowThis World, Versha Sharma will explore Mandela’s legacy in South Africa today, and explain how he brought down apartheid, which was the institutionalized racial segregation and sanctioned discrimination against the black majority population in South Africa. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

3 months ago

Nicaragua Protests Call on President Ortega to Resign | NowThis World

Nicaragua is in the midst of its deadliest unrest since the country's civil war - which ended after decades of violence and instability in 1990. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://youtu.be/VDKNMgKZoRk Hundreds have died amid government crackdowns on protests calling for President Daniel Ortega to step down. Citizens, activists, and journalists alike are calling attention to the crisis, which they say has been vastly underreported by western media. One of those people is Dánae Vílchez, a Nicaraguan journalist who has been covering the Nicaragua protests since May. We spoke to her from the capital city of Managua, Nicaragua where much of the violence is taking place. She helped put in context just how bad things have gotten. Over the last two months, those calling for Ortega to resign have been met with resistance from pro-government paramilitary forces. Amnesty International recently reported that Ortega's government is colluding with paramilitary groups, and accusing the police of intentionally allowing perpetrators of violence to flee the scene. The order from the government, the report claims, is to "shoot to kill." The government has denied any connection or responsibility to the killings. Regional human rights group, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, has been tracking the violence, and reports more than more than 300 people been killed and upwards of one thousand people injured. They have denounced the government's excessive use of force, illegal detentions, censorship of the press "and other forms of intimidation," including the deaths of hundreds of demonstrators as well as several police officers. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights was granted access to investigate the violence and even the UN has called for access. But Ortega has indicated he does not plan to step down. Still, people hope that Ortega could face international persecution, even if he can't be brought to justice in his home country. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld

3 months ago